Talk: Paul Schimmel (audio)

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Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void curator Paul Schimmel discusses the show’s conceptual framework and highlights individual artists and their work.

Paul Schimmel was the Chief Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), from 1990 to 2012, and previously served as the Chief Curator of the Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach, CA (1981–89), as well as the Curator (1975–77) and Senior Curator (1977–78) of the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX. While at MOCA, he curated Helter Skelter: LA Art in the 1990s (1992), Hand-Painted Pop: American Art in Transition 1955-1962 (1992), Sigmar Polke Photoworks: When Pictures Vanish (1995), Robert Gober: Untitled (1997), Out of Actions: Between Performance and the Object, 1949-1979 (1998), Charles Ray (1999), Willem de Kooning: Tracing the Figure (2002), Ecstasy: In and About Altered States (2005), Robert Rauschenberg: Combines (2006), © MURAKAMI (2008), Under the Big Black Sun: California Art, 1974-1981 (2011), and Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void, 1949-1962 (2012). He has won numerous awards, including two awards from the Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC), six awards from the International Association of Art Critics (AICA), and the Award for Curatorial Excellence given by The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (2001). Schimmel currently serves on the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, the La Caixa Contemporary Art Collection Acquisition Committee, and is a co-Director of the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

Culture Catalysts: Lasting Local Venues (audio)

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Culture Catalysts is a monthly series that celebrates and provides a platform for Chicagoans at the epicenter of the cultural scene. The landscape of platforms that present art and culture is always changing. Join Carolina O. Jayaram of Chicago Artist Coalition and Abigail Satinsky of threewalls in a conversation on how a venue puts down community roots and weathers a shifting arts climate.

Educator Salon: Teacher as Conceptual Artist (audio)

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Through an examination of contemporary art works that are recognized as primarily conceptual, this salon proposes the radical notion that a teacher’s curricular and pedagogical practice(s) can also be their creative practice. Durational, performance, and socially-based artworks present a wider conceptual and even aesthetic language for a pedagogy/art hybrid practice. Jorge Lucero, Assistant Professor of Art Education at The University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, leads this conversation.

Talk: What Do You See? The Science of Color in Art (audio)

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Frank Vodvarka, Professor of Fine Arts at Loyola University Chicago, engages artists Adam Brooks and Geof Oppenheimer and designer Kelli Evans in a conversation about the associations and effects of color. Vodvarka begins with an overview of the science and psychology of color, then engages the other panelists about the similarities and differences in the function and uses of color in the fields of design and fine arts.

Culture Catalysts: Michael Williams and Richard Cahan (audio)

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Culture Catalysts is a monthly series that celebrates and provides a platform for Chicagoans at the epicenter of the cultural scene. Michael Williams and Richard Cahan, co-authors of Vivian Maier: Out of the Shadows, have collaborated on seven other books, including Real Chicago, Richard Nickel’s Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City, Who We Were: A Snapshot History of America, Edgar Miller and the Handmade Home, and The Lost Panoramas: When Chicago Changed Its River and the Land Beyond. They own CityFiles Press, a Chicago publishing company that focuses on art and photography books.

Gallery Talk: Goshka Macuga (audio)

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In conjunction with the opening of the exhibition, Goshka Macuga: Exhibit, A, artist Macuga and Manilow Senior Curator Dieter Roelstraete give an in-gallery talk.

This exhibition is the first survey of work by Polish-born, London-based artist Goshka Macuga. Macuga’s work interweaves two strands that have helped define contemporary art in the last decade: artists’ increasing tendency toward historical and archival research and their growing interest in strategies of display and the dialogue between artistic and curatorial practice. Many of Macuga’s large-scale, research-intensive projects have been collaborative, with the resulting installations often incorporating the work of other artists. Initially, many of her projects tapped into overlooked traditions in art history, but in more recent years her work has taken a political turn, frequently featuring post-Soviet Poland or the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 as a backdrop. The exhibition features a selection of works that vary in size, content, and context, emphasizing the medium of collage, both two- and three-dimensional. This exhibition is organized by Dieter Roelstraete, Manilow Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Culture Catalysts: Paul Cowan (audio)

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Culture Catalysts is a monthly series that celebrates and provides a platform for Chicagoans at the epicenter of the cultural scene. Paul Cowan was born in Kansas City and currently lives and works in Chicago. He received his BFA from Milwauke Institute of Art & Design and an MFA from University of Illinois at Chicago. Exhibitions include Clifton Benevento in New York, Shane Campbell in Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Young Art in Los Angeles, James Cohan in New York, Golden Age in Chicago, Michael Jon in Miami, and Green Gallery in Milwaukee. Cowan’s work is featured in the exhibition, BMO Harris Bank Chicago Works: Paul Cowan.

Educator Salon: Curriculum as Creative Practice (audio)

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Artists and educators Rachel Harper, Avi Lessing, and Jason Lukasik approach the design of curriculum as a creative endeavor with direct parallels to contemporary art.  If curriculum is a design for ordering experience, how do contemporary curricularists approach this in a living classroom?  How do contemporary art forms help us reach beyond teaching with art and towards a deepened understanding of the art of our own teaching?  What happens when the theoretical ideal of the “art of teaching” comes into conflict with the constraints of real classroom life?

Culture Catalysts: John Edel (audio)

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Culture Catalysts is a monthly series that celebrates and provides a platform for Chicagoans at the epicenter of the cultural scene. John Edel is the Founder and Executive Director of The Plant. After purchasing the building in July 2010, he immediately began deconstruction and renovation with a vision of intentional reuse, economic development, and truly sustainable food. John’s foray into building redevelopment was at the Chicago Sustainable Manufacturing Center, a green business incubator in the Stockyards Industrial Corridor. As General Contractor, Edel took the facility from a burnt-out shell to 100 percent occupancy while using a mixture of waste-stream recycled materials and leading-edge technology to make the building exceptionally energy efficient and pleasantly non-toxic. The renovation was assisted by a core group of volunteers and by bartering with suppliers, tenants and scrappers. In previous careers, John taught computer graphics, designed sets for broadcast television, art directed video games, and worked as a chef on private railroad cars. He has a lifelong dream of combining industrial preservation and plants in a productive, conservatory-like project.

Educator Salon: Research as Creative Practice (audio)

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What does research look like as a creative practice? Artists and educators Annie Heckman, Rebecca Keller, and Peter Stover explore how different types of questions, grounded in personal, historical, and curricular concerns, can fuel our creative research in teaching and making.