April 24, 2013:
4001 N Clark St

Posted April 24, 2013

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Laszlo Moholy-Nagy is one of the undisputed greats of 20th century avant-garde art—why is the stone marking his final resting place in Graceland Cemetery so small, so hard to find?

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Moholy-Nagy, who was instrumental in directing the Bauhaus back to its original utilitarian goals—in his best-known portrait, he is shown donning an austere-looking overall of his own making, and he does not appear to smile much—first came to Chicago in 1937 to head what was then called the New Bauhaus, and later became known as the Institute of Design (the photographer Harry Callahan took over from Moholy-Nagy after his premature death in 1946; his most important patron at the helm of the Institute was Walter Paepcke, CEO of the cardboard-box-producing Container Corp. of America). He was actually born as Laszlo Weiss, the cousin of a certain Gyorgy Stern—another adopted Chicagoan, destined to become world famous as the conductor (of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra among others, for a staggering 999 performances) Georg Solti.

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The grave stone for Adrienne Françoise List Sullivan, Louis Sullivan’s mother—placed just a few feet away from her son’s grave and next to that of her husband, Patrick Sullivan.